Topic: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities  (Read 16527 times)

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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #30 on: May 19, 2014, 02:08:32 pm »
The eyes look good to me :V Keep it up!
Here is my fix. I also changed my profile pic to reflect the edit. The old eyes were too widely spaced and looked kind of derpy.
This is the old one if you want to compare.
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #31 on: July 08, 2014, 06:26:37 am »
Oh hey Page 2! Congratz me
So I didn't have internet for like the past month, so I spent most of my time drawing (whenever time permitted). I went to Okinawa, that's why.
So here's here are some pics from my sketchbook:
Page: 1 2 3 4 5

There's There are a few copy sketches in there, mostly from Endling's body language meme and さきの新月's motion practice sketches.

I kind of grew bored of using the pencil so I decided to forgo it and just stick to pure pen—and it's a lot more fun.

On the other hand, I find these lack of summer updates disturbing. We should do something about that.

EDIT: A few grammer nazi fixes. Granted, learning to proofread before posting might save me the trouble of having to modify stuff.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2014, 06:33:04 am by Mea »
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #32 on: October 08, 2014, 08:46:34 am »
Hey guys, it's been awhile. Since like before summer.
So to celebrate, have some random line art I don't feel like coloring yet.

Just kind of an excuse post to talk about random things that are going on in my livelihood, and also revive my own drawing habit because the board seems to be getting livelier again.
I've just started music composition lessons with a tutor I found online. A British guy, he seems pretty cool. Classical music, if you're curious. My first lesson went pretty ok I guess, I kind of suck at it. But we all start somewhere right? It would be pretty neat if I could compose etudes or preludes by sometime next year. And then if I can do some Touhou arrangements, we'd all be happy.  I'm noticing lots of new people around, which is always great, both for art AND music. New school year and all (for we students on board), so I hope we can all contribute to making AAA pretty active again.
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #33 on: October 09, 2014, 12:15:59 pm »
Very pretty lineart! Good luck in your music studies btw  :)

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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #34 on: October 19, 2014, 02:42:44 pm »
Here is a random mini-comic thing about Yoshika. The art is sketch-y, the story/monologue is crap, and my handwriting is terrible, but enjoy it with pleasure. Just a random fun thing. Sequential story-telling practice.
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #35 on: October 28, 2014, 01:37:12 pm »
I feel like talking about classical music, so let's enjoy it together for a bit. If you're free and bored.
And well, technically late-Romantic era music.
I don't have any formal training or practice, but I'll just make comments about whatever I feel like while you listen to my selected piece, so feel free to pull out this tab while having a Youtube tab open in another window. (If anyone does have such training, your comments will be much appreciated, but I don't want to get too technical. I would love them though)

The piece in question is an Etude-Tableau by Sergei Rachmaninoff. Etude-Tableau means 'study picture'. Technically, etudes are supposed to be music pieces that train a specific skill/technique, hence the 'study' part. Rachmaninoff ignored that and decided to make music about stuff he saw (pictures, scenery, views, art, etc.), hence the 'picture' part. He tries to capture a certain mood or image in these Etude-Tableaux, and the job of the pianist is to "paint for themselves what it most suggests". So have fun trying to interpret the mood of what the composer is trying to convey, and also what the performer is trying to paint onto your aural canvas.

Enough talk, let's get to it.
We will be using this performance by Nikolai Lugansky.
So hit play and let's begin!

Etude-Tableau Op.39 no 9 in D Major
0:00 |  The piece begins and we're immediately blasted by huge chords. Huge chords are pretty typical of Rachmaninoff, especially since he had huuge hands. Most say they resemble bell-like, Russian sounds, though I don't hear it.
0:11 | We are introduced to the main theme of the piece. Remember the 'ta-ta-taa' 'ta-ta-taa' rhythm, it's the big rhythmic theme of the piece and will be showing up a lot throughout. It's also one of Rachmaninoff's favorite rhythms and shows up in a lot of his works. It's probably an invisible detail, but the Eb chord is very emphasized in this first theme and will make a triumphant return later on.
0:20 | The main theme is restated louder and higher on the keyboard. Note also that it's not just a simple retelling, but Rachmaninoff mixes in another voice with the left hand to keep things fresh and interesting.
0:30 | This is one of the first transitional passages in the piece. Very chromatic, I think it sounds rather mischievous. The left hand gets the main voice for a bit.
0:50 | We get a sudden change of mood into something relaxing and flowing. The 'ta-ta-taa' rhythm is really emphasized here. See if you can hear a second voice playing in the left hand. The mood returns quickly into something very impatient and energetic.
1:09 | Here we start the second transitional phase of the piece. We also get to hear the big chords from the beginning again, which is followed by a short theme of falling notes. This theme also comes back later, so try to remember it.
1:26 | Another mood swing into something more calm. Man, this guy is capricious. We modulate to G major, starting section 2 of the piece.
2:20 | After a nice long, relaxing break, we find something to be excited about again. So we jump out of section 2 and start the 3rd section, which is somewhat of a modified recapitulation of section 1 (we're also back in D major). This time we build it up though, like that feel of gradually being washed over by hype. Different small musical ideas/motives from the other sections start to come and melt together here, kind of like a little kid in a toy store that can't find the time to finish playing with one toy before finding another one within reach. Or an ADHD patient in a butterfly field. See how many familiar sounds you can recognize from previous parts.
2:40 | Now the hype is real, you begin to have that Eureka fridge brilliance moment, building up to... (note the 'ta-ta-taa' chords showing itself again)
2:56 | Eb!!! I told you it would be back. The short descending theme from 1:09 also makes a triumphant return, and definitely sounding much more confident and excited than before.
3:05 | We have some big chords again, followed by the main theme, greatly reminding one of the beginning. Exciting, isn't it? Like seeing a friend you haven't met for awhile.
3:16 | Some final 'ta-ta-taa' chords before our last build up to the 2nd climax, we hear the short descending notes one last time, and then we finish off strong with a bang!

It might be good to listen to it once through before reading my comments so you don't get lost.
Personally, I don't like Lugansky's performance because he's pedal-heavy, but he emphasized some voices others didn't, and the audio quality is good, plus there's sheet music for the people who can read it.
I also recommend Vladimir Ashkenazy's interpretation because it's a lot crisper. Might sound a bit too simple though. Also, there's Vladimir Horowitz' performance which I love everything about but the ending, which is too bad, it sounds kind of rushed. Otherwise, he does sound very great and has great color in his playing, definitely check it out.

Rachmaninoff has a habit of reusing musical material in his pieces, which I personally quite love. He hints very well at climactic material from very early on, and the repetition draws the whole composition together.

I realize now that this might not necessarily be the most appropriate place to post this, but oh well, it's music, and we're studying it. To make it up to the people who didn't tl;dr, I'll try attach an edit of an idea I have later tonight. I'm trying to draw more. I switched majors from engineering to something not engineering so I actually have a lot of time now.

tl;dr: Have a listen. Enjoy.
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #36 on: November 06, 2014, 10:44:17 am »
Did I say 'today' in my last post? I meant today today, as in 'a-week-later-today'.'
Kind of a random (and relatively content full) post. I felt a bit bad that 'today' turned out to become the opening statement above.

First off, a Wakasagihime I drew on my school's Cintiq tablet. I had to sneak in at past midnight when no one else was around, but it was pretty worth it. Not because of this pic itself (it's pretty crap), but I feel like I finally understand how I'm supposed to draw with a tablet now, even ones without screens on them and that aren't totally going to blow holes in my wallet.
So with that in mind, I'm back on my semi-broken Bamboo tablet and drew a Sekibanki. I might try experimenting with a more painter-ly feel sporadically.
And finally, a Shanghai. I'm actually a fair bit pleased with this one, I like the pastel-ly-ness of it. She reminds me of a wilting flower. Went with flat colors and sharp lines to contrast with the previous one. My hair drawing might be becoming a bit better.

What I was listening to: Rachmaninoff Etude-Tableaux op.33 and 39
In particular, op.33 no.2 caught my attention as I was passively using the playlist as white noise. There's this one particular passage in that one (starting at 1:52) that strikes me as really really beautiful. It makes me think of an Eastern dreamscape of sorts. Shameless promotion? Shameless promotion. If no one minds it, I can do more classical music posts too; I'm having fun.

Why are all my posts essays.

EDIT: What color does Shanghai's hair look like on your display? I'm drawing now using an external display that has more vivid colours, but I can't ascertain whether it would be better to make the colors more vivid for my main laptop display. Because on that one, I can hardly see the yellow--it's almost white. But if I do that, it would look worse on the one I use to draw on. I blow out smoky rings of frustration. Web designers' worst nightmare.

EDIT2: A small update on the Shanghai. Colours are a picometer brighter, and added some other small changes. Head might still look a bit big, but I guess proportionally it works because, you know, she's a doll.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2014, 07:01:23 am by Mea »
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #37 on: November 06, 2014, 12:00:01 pm »
What color does Shanghai's hair look like on your display?
Faint yellow. It's contrasting well enough with the pure white background to be visible, but if it was black, I could well decide Shanghai went white.

I think you can use some display management applications to tweak the color output. Or like, changing the gamma value in your driver's settings, or just turning the "contrast" number down right on the monitor in question.

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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #38 on: December 24, 2014, 09:40:12 pm »
I feel like I haven't posted anything for much longer than only a month and a half, but whatever. I suppose that's a good thing.
Here's a page out of my sketchbook.
I've been feeling quite good about the direction I'm going in for the past few days so I'm really happy/excited. It's rather sparse but I didn't really feel like adding anything else atm. Technically I have no idea who these characters are since I don't play Kancolle, but the deep sea fleet girls are really fun to draw. It also forces me to draw stuff I don't usually draw, as in the not-people bits. It's a bit messy but I hope it's make out-able. Take that as you will. The unfinished odd-one-out in the upper left is an Alice I abandoned, couldn't get the expression right.
These are the pens I use and I absolutely love them.

What I've been listening to: 1 2
Now the latter one is interesting because apparently the composer himself thought it was haunted by demons or something and refused to perform it in public. He proceeded to 'exorcise' it by composing a really 'cleansing' piece for his next sonata. His late stuff sounds so bizarre, and yet it sits quite well with my mood.

Edit:
nothing worth an extra post. A very quick redrawing/colouring of the center sketch from that page to change my profile pic since I've been getting bored, tired, and sick of it for awhile. They're small so all the lazy messy-ness is hidden
« Last Edit: December 26, 2014, 02:20:17 am by Mea »
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #39 on: January 15, 2015, 12:05:26 pm »
Here are some really rough ones:
Wakasagihime
Koakuma
Yoshika

My goal here is to build comfort with my tablet, since I can't seem to do straight digital well. I eventually want to do something around this level in under 10 minutes. That's my goal for this month. If the background is distracting, it's because I just splatter around colours in the beginning to remove the white canvas syndrome, and then just draw whatever character seems to come to mind. Trying to just decide on pose is taking like half the time, so I'll have to try to just keep removing inhibitions. Digital just feels too 'clean', I guess, is my problem. Hence the rush here.

warning: in case you haven't already noticed, this thread also doubles as a mini-blog sort of thing for me. You can quit reading here as the following is entirely useless stuff. Since you probably don't care about me talking about me and random stuff about me, you can stop here.
That being said, I'm like waaay too busy this quarter. Well, maybe not entirely so, but no 'free' time. Every spare moment I'm devoting to studying music, currently voice leading in chords of harmony. I also started piano lessons again this quarter after 3 or so years without, and maybe 9 years since I had a good teacher (my last-last teacher had a black belt in karate, and I like cried in her lessons. Mostly my fault because I was a kid and didn't care to practice much back then). I practice last thing in the day, at around  9pm ish because I just stay in there until like 12, or today, 1am. And then I want to practice drawing, so I'm typing this out at like 3am. I'm not complaining though, to the contrary I'm like burning with excitement. To the point that physical cold isn't really affecting me. Mind over matter, I guess? Or it could just be that I'm starting to get used to it after like 2 years here. If anyone remembers that I mentioned doing online composing lessons under a tutor in a post last year, well that's a bit on hold. Didn't go so well with a huge gap in time zones and other issues, but I'm going to start again under a different tutor beginning February, which I'm also really excited for. I'm hoping to do more than just crappy drawings on this thread--hence the 'etc' part. I'm so glad touhou has such a wide variety of mediums to express your fan-ness with. On top of all this, a friend is saying he wants to do a mini one-shot manga collab with me just for funsies between the two of us. Which is going to strip away time from my music studies, but it might be fun.
And I suppose I feel a bit guilty for seeming to be quite excited with life/'life' when there's so much crap happening in the world or posting about it when others seem to be having a really hard time currently. I'm irresponsible and I'd imagine I'm insensitive and emptiheaded, and I just kind of just head-first into what I'm impassioned about and lose focus of everything else. And since I'm terrible with future things I just burn for/in the present. And when depressing moods take me, I try to channel my inner stupidity or just come by here more. No correlation, I promise. Oh, my life, my life. Where is it taking me? It's scary for me to think too hard about it. I'm just naive; and maybe as long as I'm not afraid to do what I enjoy, then I wouldn't mind dying poor, cold, wet, and alone. As long as my inner fire was extinguished by my death, and not my life. A romanticist? I'm probably dying young.

And that's just my random ramblings. I like to talk just to talk, to say stupid things just because they're stupid. And maybe I'll avoid it in the future. My apologies if you had to suffer through all that. I'll make it up somehow.
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #40 on: January 16, 2015, 03:36:36 am »
Looking at your sketchbook and tablet work gives me all kinds of warm fuzzy feelings inside.

How do you like the feel of the Cintiq versus a regular tablet?
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #41 on: January 16, 2015, 08:35:30 am »
Looking at your sketchbook and tablet work gives me all kinds of warm fuzzy feelings inside.

How do you like the feel of the Cintiq versus a regular tablet?
Haha, thanks. Just like getting smothered by pandas wrapped in silk worms, no?

Interestingly enough, it felt the same. Having the screen right below the pen was only more convenient. It still felt unnatural compared to good ol' paper and pencil. I'd imagine it's easier than having no screens though. Using it kind of gave me a better sense of how to use my regular tablet, oddly enough. Something about the oddness of drawing on a plastic tablet transferred over; I even felt more coordinated with my usual tablet. Strange.
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #42 on: January 16, 2015, 09:17:23 am »
Mind uploading more of your sketchbook?

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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #43 on: January 20, 2015, 11:43:17 am »
Mind uploading more of your sketchbook?
It's actually not that full of cool stuff. Only the recent ones are, and I haven't had much time to draw recently. But yeah, I can definitely share more!

As part of my first contribution to the music side of things on this thread, I thought I'd take a look at 'classic' Zun's brand of crazy piano runs. Off the top of my head, when I think of this being used, I think of Early to Mid Windows period. So pre-UFO era. From UFO on, it's still there, but in the background. And I think the most iconic would be Mokou's Reach for the Moon's middle section. So I decided to take a look at that.
Just as a forewarning, I'll reiterate that I have no former training in music or music theory. This is all based on stuff from books, online, or just how I hear things. If someone does have such education notices anything missing or any errors, please leave a comment!

I imagine this will only be somewhat useful to those that are trying to emulate Zun's style and see what he does and how he does it. I'll try to keep things simple so anyone can enjoy this though.

I have prepared two version of the passage in question: slow, original speed
And here are four ways I've looked at the score:
1) Harmony and Melody
2) Major and Minor Chords
3) Directions and Leadings
4) Miscellaneous

I think the very core of 'classic' Zun's music is rather simple, and it starts with the bass. The bass moves from F to G to A and so on, simply moving up and down.
So I guess I'll just start from the top and make my way down.
If you take a look at (2), you'll notice that there's only two minor chords (the light blue). We start on an F major chord, then move to a G major chord. Now, because these two chords are major, I expect to hear an A major chord next. Instead, we get an A minor chord which leaves this phrase sounded very unfinished.
Then we go back to the F major chord in measure 3, followed again by the G major chord. Our expectations were flopped last time, but it provided a guideline for something else.
If you open up (3), you'll notice the pink line connecting the notes F->G->A in the bass. This second time around, we have F and G again, but this time, G leads into G#, which again feels unfinished in a different sort of way, even though our need for a major chord was satisfied. This G# then leads into the A above the D chord in measure 5. So instead of getting the F->G->A like in the beginning, we ended up with a F->G->G#->A, which gives a feeling of having tripped, before being able to put a foot back onto familiar ground.
Going back to (2), we can see that we're in a a minor chord, D minor, and a 3rd lower than where we started from. In the actual theme, this is where the catchy, jumpy rhythmic part kicks in. The rest progresses fairly smoothly. The D moves to an E, and then to the F. Here above the F chord we hit the highest point in the melody, a high F. Then we have to go back to an E a few more times before we can reach all the way back up to the A again, kind of like hanging a carrot in front of your face and snatching it away a few times. Friendly teasing, I think. The last three chords mirror the first three chords in the beginning. Except this time, the A minor chord is an A major chord, and we finally get closure on that initial need. We then repeat with more drums and what not.

So that was my overview. The next part is probably going to be uninteresting to anyone casually reading (ie: probably only the touhou music people here may find it interesting), so feel free to skip it.
Since we haven't touched (1) yet, take a look at it. The color coding is by chords and totally by random. You'll notice that Zun uses pretty conventional non-harmonic tones here: every non-harmonic tone can be classified either as a neighbor tone or a passing tone, with the rare appoggiatura. The most interest would have to be measures 4 and 5. Measure 4 may be coloured a bit strangely, but if you open up (3) again, you'll notice that the A's are the 5ths of the E in measure 5, and the D is the lower neighbor/leading tone of the same E. Because they also belong to the D chord in measure 6, they have both an anticipatory and leading function. Aside from that, you'll notice in the same (3) page that pretty much all the strong beats are occupied by notes that are a fifth below the note in the previous strong beat (the ones that aren't are either octaves or neighbors). It makes for pretty convincing lines because of the mini V-I relations they create. In addition to that, if we consider each measure a different 'phase' of the passage, then you will also notice that the last note of one 'phase' is almost always either the fifth or the leading tone of the first note of the next 'phase'. Finally, if you open up (4), you will notice two interesting things that happen in measure 3. First, the A that was in measure 1 is now a G in measure 3. It seems pretty random, but it has a slight noticeable effect, especially if you listen to the slow audio version. The melody in the measures 1 and 2 sounds free, not lending too much tendency to the next harmony; it simply floats and glitters over the chords in the bass. In measures 3 and 4, more notes from the next chord is mixed in, and it gives it a kind of forward moment, in addition to slightly more melancholic sound because of the lowered note. The second interesting thing about measure 3 is the melody above the second, latter chord. If you look at only the harmonic notes, you'll notice that they are the same, and appear in the same pattern, D-_-_-B, D-_-_-B. Which is to say that it doesn't move. In the constantly moving melodic line, it serves as a sort of static moment, maybe even a dramatic pause before we hit the E major chord in the next measure. Only the contour changes directions a lot before finally pointing downward. And then you'll notice the more frequent use of repeated figurations as we get closer to the climax of the short passage. Something else interesting pops up if we divide the passage into half. The last measure of both halves end in an ascending, then descending motion. It serves as a kind of period to that one half section. If we divide the halves into halves, this becomes clearer. In both of the first halves, the last measure ends in an upward motion, like the intonation of lifting your tone at the end of a question. So the structure also falls into a pretty simple question->answer, question->answer form, with the last answer being more definite because of the aforementioned A major chord.

edit: If you go back to (1), notice how the anticipation tones are used. They begin in measure 2, to lead smoothly into measure 3. We insert some into the first chord of the second section, measure 3, which creates some forward momentum. But notice that there are no anticipation notes in the second chord of measure 3, unlike in measure 1. Because of this, there's nothing else to base expectation on, and so the transition into the E major chord in measure 4 comes as a fresh, new surprise. After this comes the climax sections of the passage, and anticipation notes cease to exist. Instead, we rely on faster/steeper ascending and descending contours via simple arpeggiations of the chords. The end just features scale runs and other stuff.

edit2: Have I mentioned that I really love the little dip after the high A in measure 4? It just sounds so nice. This sounds more like a short pause than the static motion in the previous measure. I can think of a few reasons why this was done. First, by doing so, the melodic line dips under and can't reach up as high. Otherwise, we would go beyond the highest F in measure 6, and the 'summit' wouldn't seem as high. The second has to do with leading like I mentioned above, with the A leading to the E in the next measure, along with the D. The short pause is a nice breather too.

edit3: Concerning the crossed out section, my mistake. The E is the fifth of A, not the other way around. Though they share a fifth relationship, it's not a V-I one. Also, I mistakenly marked the F in measure 6 as leading to the B as a fifth relation. Technically it's a diminished fifth. /Headdesk

Anyway, that was a mouthful. Hopefully it was some interesting stuff for the people here on this thread trying to compose in Zun's style.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2015, 01:02:37 am by Mea »
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #44 on: August 13, 2015, 07:33:43 pm »
I'm so bored I guess I'll update this thing. Like, creatively unchallenged? Or maybe just trying to get progress done but not seeing any on the other boat I'm sailing on. Guess I'll ride the drawing boat for a little bit before going about my usual day on the other one.

Random old old thing thing
Something that started months ago that was actually finished weeks ago after a huge hiatus that was uploaded today. Go figure. (Oh that bottom half of the page looks terrible. Except maybe Miko. It looks aaararasdl;fkhaweifjgh terribad, it's so embarassing. If you don't know what it's for, don't bother finding out. It's really quite embarrassing too. My dignity would shatter.)
Some random little haphazard quick thing I did just now to stave off the plague. Trying to do more full body practices and also interactions between people. And also forcing myself to not go over the same line once, ie: sketchy messy lines. When I remember to. Oh god I just noticed that arm.

Haven't drawn in so long my edge is rusting. Ouch.
Guess the medicine for boredom is new vistas. Oh wait, I just started channeling another third of the Prismriver sisters yesterday. That's new right? Unless someone has any bright ideas. Challenges. Something fun. Oh oh oh.
Trying to do more &Etc.
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #45 on: October 07, 2015, 11:38:25 am »
A small update to show progress with the figure drawing book kinoko(?) mentioned in the Art Tips thread that I bought. Currently on pg 48/235, and I'm already liking my progress. Those arms are something I would never have even dared to attempt before. Almost through with the basic figure drawing chapters.
For comparison, check out this or this (the one on the right).... lol.
She's supposed to be holding giant rings or like a bouquet of small bells or something but I forgot to put it in orz.

Also, to whoever started that MoTK music club (BT?), I know I'm late already, but I started 2 weeks ago and I'm stuck in the usual place I get stuck, slowly trying to force myself to finish. Doesn't help that school started for me again, but I'll get it there.
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #46 on: October 07, 2015, 06:38:06 pm »
The idea behind those guides is fine, but you've dumped proportions into the water. It's easy to be blinded since you don't always know what the guides translate to, so don't hesitate to make changes on the way.

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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #47 on: October 07, 2015, 08:49:34 pm »
Your critical evaluation is as helpful and appreciated as usual, yeah the book hasn't even glanced on proportions yet. Unless they won't, but we'll see. Blind, yes, can't see them as of now.
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #48 on: October 08, 2015, 11:35:45 am »
I'm most impressed by how you were able to draw that glomp in an earlier post; I'd say it's pretty good! :)

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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #49 on: January 31, 2016, 05:07:07 pm »
I'm most impressed by how you were able to draw that glomp in an earlier post; I'd say it's pretty good! :)
Thank you ^^

Began continuing the book after several months of drawing famine. Finally got to head->chest->front of shoulders in the figure drawing book. I should probably revisit some of the older stuff since I've forgotten a lot of it.
Anyway, first two are from a week or half ago, latter two are from tonight. Just random sketches to keep stuff alive. Nothing really impressive. More like a progress report.
Random librarian girl - Accidentally emphasized wrong side of sternocleidomastoid
Random girl with markings - Super random
Reisen - I like drawing her with spiky hair
Koishi - Nothing to say

So hands, arms, legs, anything not upper torso or head is really sketchy atm. Hopefully I get to those sections soon enough so I can actually draw full bodied people. Proportions are still probably wack and those books look like they're going to topple over.
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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #50 on: February 01, 2016, 09:26:46 am »
Went over the thread quickly and can just say that you made remarkable progress. I really dig the style you developed, it's a light-hearted and soulfull one. Even the lack of detail in for example the hands seems like it's part of the style, even though a little more fleshing out wouldn't hurt. Still, really cool stuff.

Mеа

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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #51 on: July 09, 2016, 02:04:01 am »
I really dig the style you developed, it's a light-hearted and soulfull one
Well that's the first time someone's called my drawings soulful ^^;; thanks

Some more of the 'etc.' Going to the con made me want to try something artish. So here's a piano arrangement of Frozen Capital of Eternity from Touhou 15 LoLK's stage 4. It's not technically my first piano arrangement since I have like at least 10+ sketches on my disk, but this is the first finished one. Best way to get better is to practice and all... This one took about a day and half, yesterday and today.
One of my more favorite stage themes, in the same vein as how I feel about TD's stage 5 theme.

e: I've uploaded the score. This is a solo piece, and I intend to make future arrangements also playable (or at least technically playable, haha ^^;)
I'm estimating the difficulty on some random arbitrary scale from 1 to 10~11, where 1 is like a Twinkle Twinkle Little Star and a ~8/9ish is like a competitive classical piece.

Sheet Music
Frozen Capital of Eternity -------- Difficulty: ☆☆☆☆☆ (quick passages, crossing hands, juggling multiple lines between hands)
« Last Edit: July 09, 2016, 05:55:37 am by Mеа »
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Mеа

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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #52 on: August 22, 2016, 07:04:00 pm »
I've been stuck in a bit of a creative slump block thing lately for the past lateness, it kinda sucks. So to give myself some ideas, I'm going to be doing this wall of text thing. Mostly for my own sake to get my thoughts out, but it may be very useful and/or interesting to other music doing people here.

---------------------------------------------

The piece I'll be (loosely) analyzing is Rachmaninoff's etude-tableaux op. 39 no. 8. I've been coming back to this piece a lot to listen to among everything else he's done for awhile now for some reason. I just like it I guess. Link to the piece is here. Conveniently, the video comes with the score. Also it's probably one of the best interpretations available to listen to on youtube.

---

First things first, we're in the key of d minor here (and I may be wrong, but technically I think this might actually be in the D aeolean mode). Roughly speaking, the piece divides into about 4 sections: the A section, the B section, the climax/transition section, the recapitulation, and a final short coda/ending section. The first climax occurs at the end of the B section, while a second, bigger climax occurs in the climax section (obviously).

---

The first section -- the A section -- introduces us to the mood of the piece. It starts at 0:00 and ends at 1:00. To describe it really unsubstantially, it's a very dreamy mood. It just kinda floats around peacefully, like fuzzy nostalgic memories of a safe, nurturing place. I'm going to bring this up a lot, but this piece is very non-pushy, it's non-demanding to listen to. These, are, again, kind of a vague unsubstantive description, but Rachmaninoff manages to create this effect wonderfully through harmonic means. And this is more or less one of the main points I want to analyze in this whole post, how he creates this effect. The answer is harmony, he uses very 'non-demanding' harmony. What do I mean by that? One of the first interesting things I noticed throughout the entire piece is the proliferation of root motions by thirds in the harmonic progressions. To put it another way, there's not very many motions by fifths. The dominant harmony (ie: the chord of the fifth) is named aptly, since it is and has always been the most dominant harmony in many many many songs and pieces. It strongly leads the ear towards wanting to return to the tonic harmony. One of the ways he achieves a watery, non-pushy, sort of effect is by avoiding these strong, tense harmonies.


The piece also opens up very still-like -- the first 7 measures are all harmonized by the tonic d minor harmony. This is actually pretty typical of rachmaninoff to introduce a piece by sticking to the tonic harmony, but here it works to the advantage of the mood by making a lot of motion in the right hand without actually changing anything or actually going anywhere (harmonically speaking). Kind of like swishing your hands over the surface of a pool of water or ripples in a puddle, there's motion but no motion. And it may seem rather insignficant, but it's very quite effective. Because the harmony remains static, the ear isn't at all being pulled around in any direction. In the consant cycle between tension and stability in music, the lack of any tension means that the mood that we create instead becomes a directionless, lofty cloud sort of thing.

---

The motion by thirds is very motivic, it's everywhere. Even in these first eight measures and it's not even exclusive to the harmony. The initial melodic phrases end on an E, this small phrase repeats twice, and then the phrase is repeated two more times, this time falling lower to the C below it, a distance of a major third.

Before I move on, I must mention the second, somewhat hidden motif in the right hand melody. I refer to the lower notes of the right hand. Taking the first measure for example, the secondary motif is the descending scalar line of G-F-E. Here, it skips every other eighth note. Note that this scalar motif is also the distance of a third between its highest and lowest notes (G and E).

--

I can't be talking about the first eight measures forever so I'll move on (but there's so much to discuss ><). The short consequent phrase on measure 8 (@0:15) is harmonized by F major, then a f minor. From the initial harmony of d minor, we have here another motion by a third, this time in the harmony.

The short two measure utterance falls back down on the initial E that the first melodic phrase from before ended on. From here (@0:20), we have four measures of a variation on the initial theme that transitions back to the initial theme, but as another variation of the whole first section. This transitionary passage is harmonized by a minor, another motion by the distance of a 3rd from the f minor we had previous. My skepticism about the key being in d minor stems from this harmonisation, and because of the noticeable avoidance of using the major 3rd in the 'dominant' harmony, ie: using the minor dominant instead of a regular dominant harmony (which uses the leading tone).

The third and fourth repititions of the initial theme in this short transitionary passage (@0:25) introduces a variation on the second, somewhat hidden motif that I talked about earlier, this time as an actual second voice in the upper staff. The difference is that the scalar descend is now at the time interval of a eighth note (as opposed to eighth note + eighth 'rest' = quarter note), and that it lasts until the beginning of the next measure this time. But we still keep the distance of a third, from the C in mm12 to the A in mm13 for the third repitition, and the C in mm13 to the A on the 'and' beat of the downbeat of mm14. The use of more chromaticism allows Rachmaninoff to keep the final distances the same while halving the time intervals between the descending notes, while also introducing more tension/ambiguity from the dissonance inherent in chromaticism.

---

The transitionary passage leads us back into familiar territory, repeating the first section again. We fall harmonically from the a minor down back to the initial d minor. Which is the minor dominant to the tonic, so I'm guessing this really is d aeolean. This may be just my opinion, but the use of 'unconvincing' harmonies and pepperings of chromaticism is starting to build some tension that isn't being fully discharged even by the return to the initial theme. I'd say it's Rachmaninoff's clever use of harmonies and actual strategy, so that he can exploit that buildup of tension later in the climax. I'm a bit late in mentioning this, but note that the counter melody in the left hand is prominently intervals of thirds, more so here at the repeat. There's not much to say here (@0:29) beyond that, so I'll skip to 0:44 so come join me when you get there.

We're back (@0:44) at the little rising passage that we're familiar with, but here instead of sticking to d minor like last time, we go up a bit, a 3rd, to F major, before going back down to d minor again at the end of the rising passage, just before the short consequent phrase. Note that the F major that we rise to is the same harmony that we rose to earlier (@0:16) at the part we're currently rising up to. Instead, we add more harmonic motion. We fall from this F major to a d minor before going one more third lower to the Bb major in this next short segment (@0:48). Harmonically speaking, we're currently lower than we've yet been and also the melodic notes are higher than any other yet encountered. This short segment itself follows the same harmonic progression that's been established earlier, going from Bb major to bb minor to mirror the F major to f minor progression from before. Note that in going from a Bb major to bb minor, we necessary lower the third of this chord and obtain the Db tone, which is the first time this tone has been used in this piece as of yet. I'll get to the significance of this tone in a bit, but until then let's move on.

---

Next we have yet again another short transitionary passage that is initially similar to the first one, but the latter half is quite different as it transitions into the B section of the piece. Again, we're a 3rd away from the previous bb minor harmony at d minor, which is the tonic. The 'unconvincing' returns to the tonic again add more invisible tension to the piece. Note the scalar descent in the LH in the latter half of this passage, which somewhat mirrors what the latter half of the first transitionary passage did, but this time instead of starting over again in its descent, it just continues downwards. And also note that the notes that aren't part of the descending line in the LH in this latter half are prominently placed the distance of a 3rd apart from each other.


Remember how I mentioned earlier that the Db tone is significant? Well it's significant because it's the enharmonic equivalent of the note that is actually very very structurally significant, C#. And this C# shows up for the first time in the piece here at the last two measures of the whole A section (@0:57). Why is it structurally significant? Well I'll get to that even later, but just note that C# here appears alongside a G#, and they both here play the rather humble role as passing tones between C and D, and G and A, respectively, serving to add some chromaticism to an otherwise diatonic, ascending scalar line.

-----

Meanwhile, the scalar descent in the LH from the previous passage has managed to descend (albeit an octave lower) to a low G in this new B section (@1:01). The new melodic theme is still quite remniscent to our initial A theme - very 'fluttery', though much more active and primarily downward moving. However it's much more romantic. We enter the new section on the harmony of g minor and very soon move on to a C harmony, which in turn falls again very naturally to the harmony of an F. It's much more harmonically lively, not to mention that we're finally moving in intervals of 5ths! This is what ushers in a fresh breeze of life in this new section.

We hear another repeat of this new theme at 1:15, this time harmonized by c minor. The progression from C major to c minor, ie: going from a major harmony to a minor harmony, is already something we have encountered before. Likewise, this repeat soon falls to F major (@1:19), the descent of a fifth.

---

The repeat follows in the footsteps of the original in again rising upwards, but harmonically we take a step into an unexpected direction at 1:26 by falling a major 3rd instead from F major to the harmony of Db major. Hey, Db again! And it is precisely this Db harmony that leads to our first big climax of the piece at 1:28. But what awaits us at this very climax is a G major flat 9 chord, which is the distance of a tritone away from our precious D flat. Not only have we not yet encountered this interval jump yet in our harmonic progressions, we just moved away from our critical D flat harmony! What gives? I haven't explained yet why our D flat/C sharp is so critical yet, and just taking my word for it isn't quite sufficient, nor is it really useful in analyzing stuffs at all. Turns out, this G harmony is also very important! But why, why? Please just tell usss. But hold on still, I'll get to it surely enough. For now, let's just satisfy ourselves by observing more occurances of scalar/chromatic ascents and descents, more movements by intervals of a 3rd, etc.

---

We move out of the first climax at 1:39 to take a little breather before out next, bigger, harsher climax. Somehow we've made it back to being harmonized by G major again. Which, if you remember, is the unexpected harmony that I noted above at the first climax and, if you remember even further back, is the same G harmony that we encountered at the beginning of the B section (@1:01) -- although that one was g minor. It may be different, but we've encountered this "G" enough times for it to have to have some kind of significance right? This next passage infact is all anchored on top of a low G pedal point. The first two measures of this transitionary passage into the climax is tame enough, being harmonized by a G major, and, despite the numerous accidentals, is still prominently featuring notes from the G major chord. Note that C# has crept its way in here, in the RH, but this time as part of the primary melodic line. But it is still acting as a passing tone, this time between the descending D and C line. Note that this is material that we've encountered before. It is infact the descending scalar line that we've seen in many places, but also in the very beginning as what I called somewhat hidden, the time interval/speed is even the same, descending at the speed of a quarter note, or every other eighth note. The phrase itself is a paraphrasing or variation of the variated initial motif, the one we heard at 0:29, or the repeat of the initial theme way back in the A section.

As the transitionary passage travels onward it becomes more and more increasingly chromatic in its descending line, but still anchored by the low G, which even drops an octave lower as if needing more weight to counterbalance the increasing dissonance weighing down from above. The chromaticism escalates, and by the third measure of this passage (@1:46) we can observe the formation of a distinguishable chord in the RH, a C# diminished 7th chord. With this information in mind, we can look back at the previous two measures and see that, indeed, the random-seeming chromaticism can actually be rationalized as a C#dim7 chord slowly invading into the sonic space of the anchoring harmony of G major.

--

But... wait, you say. C#? Where have I heard of that recently... oh wait!

That's right, remember that tone I told you was quite structurally important? That C#/Db? Well here it is again, being rude and slowly invading our harmonies. Perhaps you can take a gander at why this tone is significant now, and then extrapolate that to guess where this piece may be going at this rate. If you think back to the first climax, you will remember that we fell from a Db major harmony to a G major harmony. This time, we are in a G major harmony, and the C# harmony (which is enharmonically equivalent to Db) is invading our harmony. In a way, you can think of this buildup to the second climax as a sort of parody of the first climax, where instead of going from Db to G, this time we're going from G to C#. Kinda. "Kinda" as in the G isn't going anywhere -- it's anchored right there. The C# is creeping in and entangling itself with the G, that's what I mean by "kinda" and "parody".

--

As we build up, the piece starts to develop another scalar ascent in the RH. The notes of this scalar ascent are taken from their respective diminished 7th chords, which you can see preceding them. Here they alternate between the C# dimished 7th chord from before and a Eb dimishined 7th chord (hey another third). The LH on the other hand slowly abandons its scalar descent and abbreviates it into a repeating pattern of (G)-(F#)-(C Bb). By the very end of the increasing dissonance, our anchor, the G, loses out and all we hear is just this repeating three-note repetition of (G)-(F#)-(C Bb).

--

We reach our second climax at 1:55, where the tone of C# has now managed to completely entangle itself with the G tone, amalgamating as as maximally dissonant C#-G-C#-G-C# chord. And finally we can understand the significance of these two tones, G and C#/Db, they are the very two tones that define the second, greater climax! With the abundance of preparation and foreshadowing, this climax is as satisfying and non-arbitary as an expertly foreshadowed event or plot-twist in a novel.

The RH carries out an intensely chromaticized mockery of the familiar initial motif while the LH takes the logical extreme of the ascending scalar motif by chromatically ascending the scale. We the climax at 1:58 but we are yet far from escaping from the aftershocks caused by its intense dissonance. This next retransitionary passage into the recapitulation serves as a sort of recovery phase from the trauma the dissonance applied to our sense of tonality, which is in total shambles at this point. This recovery period is notably about twice as long as any transitionary passage before it.

--

Here in this retransitionary, recovery passage, we start by soon establishing a stable anchoring point of G, once again. The inner notes of the RH traces out the familiar descending scalar motif, here as F#-Fnatural-E, still chromatic as we are still recovering from the aftershocks of chromaticism. The upper notes of the RH are a paraphrasing of the tail of the variation on the initial theme we heard in the buildup to the secondary climax (@1:39). Though chromatically altered, the notes are still C-B then a jump up to E (specifically, E5). In a way we are treading backwards from the climax by prodding along similar ground, like a retreating of the waves on a seashore after overreaching too far on the sand, a sort of mirroring effect.

Slowly the notes readjust themselves over the stable G note until they've finally aligned themselves as notes diatonic to the initial tonality of d minor. As the notes have now recovered a little from the chromaticism and back to diatonicism, we can even see that the descending scalar line from the inner notes of the RH have now changed (@2:05) from F#-F-E to F-E-D, falling down to the tonic D which will help allow us to welcome back the tonality of D again after we retransition over back. By 2:12 we have now recovered as much as possible from the climax, unfolding here as a long diatonic scalar descent down to the downbeat of the recapitulation on a D. Note here the interval jumps of 3rds returns, emphasizing the D by jumping downwards from the F to the D.

---

The recapitulation starts at 2:15, and though we have managed to salvage our tonality, the mood has changed. The aftershocks of the climax remains, this time as restless energy, for the initial theme is now placed within a very active accompaniment, blocks of chords flood the RH while the LH jumps up and down the keyboard in a very spaced out arpeggio. As though freed from a long dream, the harmony now freely moves around richly, perhaps enabled by the climax.

The last memory of the climax returns in as a wisp of a movement upwards at 3:06, alternating the D minor tonic chord with a chord of C# major. The one measure here at 3:07 is a paraphrase of the dissonant, repetitive three-notes heard at the buildup to the second climax at 1:48. The piece ends finally, as though exhausted, in a whisper, as though to allude back to the dreamy mood long forgotten from the beginning of the piece.


------------------------------------


Wow, phew, what a piece! I love it a lot, it's so beautiful. As a final little observance, note how the prominent notes between the sections of the whole piece is itself reflective of the universal fluttering motif of the piece. The first base tones/harmonies of sections A, B, and the recapitulation are, respectively, D, G, and D. Then comparing the tonality of the piece with the chord in the climax, we have D and C# respectively, which then resolves back to the D in the recapitulation. Both of these are rather evocative of the little three-note figure littered all over the piece, aren't they? The jumping forward and jumping back sort of fluttering, that motif. I find these little details really exciting and awe-inspiring.


To wrap things up, I hope this can be inspiring or helpful to someone here, I was really excited doing this and had a lot of fun, I hope you do too. But as a little disclaimer, I don't have much musical education, so this is all based on amateurish observation that I had to pick up from self-studying.


Till next time, ta-ta~
« Last Edit: August 22, 2016, 07:34:11 pm by Mеа »
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Mеа

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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #53 on: August 25, 2016, 10:00:52 pm »
I'm in a bit of a talktive mood without really having much to contribute, so I guess I'll just keep talking then... Still in a bit of a slump.

I want to do another talk again about another classical piece -- I did rachman's etude-tableaux earlier this week, today I feel like talking about the other piece that I've been in love with lately, a charming little piece, the first of four, from Scriabin's Four Pieces op 51 set titled 'Fragilité'. It was a bit of a lucky accident that I discovered it since it just happened to come up while I wasn't paying attention on youtube's new autoplay feature thing. It's really an amazing moment to discover a new piece you like from the guy who's pretty much your favourite composer.

There's only one video (here) with sheet music available but it's of the whole set. I'll only be talking about the first though. If you take a listen through it you might think it's evocative of the similar sort of mood that the other one (rachmaninoff's etude-tableaux op 39 no 8) I talked about previous also evoked -- rather dreamy and floaty. But unlike that one, scriabin's here is completely without the melancholy, however subtle, that is pervasive in rachmaninoff's works. Rather reflective of their own personalities I suppose: while rachmaninoff was constantly struggling against depression and melancholy, scriabin was an optimist (however weirdly delusional) and a bit of an airhead. Fragilite has that similar sort of nostalgia-vibes but without the bittersweetness, perhaps like a true window into a gentle, quiet past instead of a retrospective daydream like the etude-tableaux.

So putting the insubstantive descriptions aside, let's talk about the exciting stuff, the harmony! As always let's start with the key, we're in Eb major here, Scriabin did love his major keys. A cursory examination of the score will perhaps strike your observation with an oddity. Where are the tonic, Eb major, harmonies? They are almost entirely absent from the piece save the last third of it, with the only 'clean' Eb major chord finally appearing for the first time literally as the last chord in the piece. This is very scriabin for scriabin to be doing around this time in his life, his mid to late-middle period of his works, to avoid the tonic harmony. Well, what could be the point in that? I'm glad you're curious and it's a pretty neat thing really. I mentioned last time that the dominant harmony always wants to fall down to the tonic, to release tension. Since a big part of music is about the tension-release cycle of the harmonic progressions, taking away the tonic -- the return to the home-sweet-home, would mean taking away the release part of the tension-release cycle. Which would mean that the tension continually builds to chaos, no? Well not quite. It's not so dramatic. Maybe I should rephrase my words, instead of saying 'tension', how about I say 'longing' instead? The dominant harmonies create a longing to return home, to the tonic harmony, but without a home to return to immediately, we tease the listener with this longing feeling. And this may be one of the effects that contribute to the 'nostalgia' effect that the harmony evokes. To say this again in different words, scriabin at this time started to put a lot more emphasis on the dominant and pre/subdominant harmonies while putting the tonic harmony a bit further out of reach as a distant goal to be longed for. It also had the additional benefit of fitting his personal philosophy of (emotional, physical, sexual, etc) longing and desiring as a powerful goal. There was a lot of eroticism involved in his philosophy which carried over to his compositions, one notable feature being, again, heightening longing and desirousness by removing the tonic, the home, the *release* further away.

That's enough said, let's move on. From the very first measure we start off with a pretty weird chord: Ab-Eb-C-Fb, what's this? From my mentioning of the emphasis on dominant harmonies above, you may guess that there are going to be lots of Bb chords in this piece and indeed, it's right there in the very next measure. So what's this one? Scriabin from his middle period on gradually started to tinker with altered chords more and more as he composed more and this seems like one of those chords. It's a predominant harmony of some kind since it progresses to Bb in the next measure and indeed, it's actually the altered dominant seventh of Bb. The actual dominant seventh of Bb would of course be F-A-C-Eb, but scriabin lowers the root and the third to make it Fb-Ab-C-Eb, so perhaps we can think of it as a minor dominant seventh with a lowered root. It gets more interesting though. If it weren't for the lowered root, the Fb, the chord would be perfectly diatonic here in Eb major and in fact he does a bit of a bait-and-switch by making the Fb the last note to sound in the descending arpeggio in the LH. So what starts as a perfectly normal sounding diatonic harmony at the last moment becomes a bit ambiguous with the lowered Fb. And 'ambiguity' really is a key word here, the whole impressionistic vibe we get from this piece likely owes a lot to the ambiguity scriabin loves to toss in with the altered chords. The chord is even more tonally ambiguous because if we ignore the Eb, then we get just Fb-Ab-C, which is an augmented chord. Which as you may know is not a chord that appears in any minor or major key and hence is why it has its tonally ambiguous status -- it belongs nowhere, to put it a bit cheesily.

The chord moves to the innocuous Bb dominant seventh chord naturally. Considering our strange chord previous, the bass motion then becomes Fb to Bb, the interval of a tritone. Bass motion by a tritone is extremely common the further down you go in scriabin's works, but considering how tonal we still are here in this piece, it's still a pretty janky interval to jump by even if it does flow nicely -- even more ambiguity.

The piece continues on like so, moving around naturally between dominant-y seventh chords and altered chords while the melody continues to unfold without stopping, like shards of fractured light shining through an endlessly rotating kaleidoscope, quite fitting the title.

We finally get to hear the tonic Eb as a pedal tone on the last page as the melody unfolds for one last time before finally resting on a pure Eb major chord at the very end.

Very charming, it's a wonderful piece.


It's an interesting experiment to compare the similar and yet dissimilar effects created by the two very different approaches taken here by the two composers between this piece and last time's piece. Whereas rachmaninoff introduced the dreamy, still mood by having the harmony itself remain still on the tonic and build tension through 'unconvincing' returns to the tonic and avoidance of dominant harmonies, scriabin freely changes harmony and emphasizes dominant harmonies, and removes the tonic to a faraway place so that that the dominant harmonies take on a feeling of longing instead. Quite, quite interesting.
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Mеа

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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #54 on: December 08, 2016, 09:46:32 pm »
No content submission but I feel a little depressed so I feel the need to talk somewhere. Just a little post on what I'm doing and up to I guess.

Decided to get a cheap value bundle of orchestral instruments that sound ok out of the box for Christmas since I always wanted to get into actual orchestration. So I've been diving deep into reading up on orchestration techniques and videos and listening to a bunch of orchestral works that I don't usually listen to to broaden my listening repertoire (I've mostly only stuck to piano stuff up to this point). I'm a bit more excited about doing touhou orchestral arrangements than piano arrangements since I find the latter a bit difficult to do because of the limited timbral range. I mean, if I were actually good at this stuff it'd be no problem but I'm still super sucky so I'm still in need of more arranging/writing practice. Partly it has to do with my not wanting to make trivial transcriptions, and my lack of,.. creativity atm, I guess is what it is, is making it hard for me to see how to develop or arrange the given melodies into something new and exciting and even meaningful. I'd like to tell a story of a character or location or whatever without sounding so presumptuous or narmy and melodramatic about it. The expanded timbral range I'm hoping will ease up some of my options for developing themes.
As for when I may be able to put up  actual sketches or results of orchestration, idk. By my track record, perhaps pretty later on, and I like to only show stuff I'm at least decently of positive opinion on. Like that frozen capital of eternity piano arrangement I put up, I enjoy an average amount. It's super trivial and juvenile in creativity for an arrangement (really it's like hardly not a transcription) but ZUN's original song is really good so despite what it is I'm ok with it.

Well enough blind rambling, if you cared enough or were bored enough to read my mumblings, thanks ^^ very much appreciated. I'm probably gonna be really embarrassed of having posted this in like an hour.

Might put up a  or two later so it's not just a wall of non media in AAA here
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Mеа

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Re: [Art&Etc]Bite-Size Randosities
« Reply #55 on: February 04, 2017, 03:18:56 am »
been drawing more recently, been trying to keep up a daily drawing thing.
it's amazing how one little setting change can make drawing soooo much easier.
it was the control opacity by pressure checkbox
:persona:
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